November 17th is World Prematurity Day! #protectpreemies #rsv

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World Prematurity Day

Quincy, the Preemie. Once Tiny, Always Strong.

If you’ve been reading my blog for awhile, you know that Quincy was born a little early. Almost 8 full weeks early. Quincy came screaming into this world at 32 weeks and 3 days. She weighed 2 pounds 14 ounces and was just a smidgen under 16 inches long. Quincy was so feisty they kicked her out of the NICU when she was barely over a week old. She spend 5 weeks and 1 day in the hospital. She never needed oxygen, she was always a trooper.

She’s now a feisty 2 and an almost half year old. She goes to school, just like her big brother and she loves kitties. Quincy has a few developmental delays likely caused by her prematurity, and she’s not walking without assistance yet. She also wears glasses to help correct her nearsightedness (I’d love to say they are JUST a fashion piece) but other than that, she’s doing great!

But not all preemies are like Quincy.

World Prematurity Day

November 17 is World Prematurity Day when we focus everyone’s attention on the global problem of premature birth. Join us in raising awareness.

  • In the United States, 1 in 8 babies is born prematurely.
  • Worldwide, 15 million babies are born too soon each year.
  • The rate of premature birth increased by more than 20 percent between 1990 and 2006
  • In nearly 40 percent of premature births, the cause is unknown.
  • Premature birth is the number 1 killer of newborns.

RSV Awareness

We escaped RSV, but most little ones don’t. Considering RSV affects almost ALL babies before the age of two, AND that Quincy is a preemie, that’s pretty amazing.

RSV Quick Facts:

  • • RSV is the leading cause of infant hospitalization, responsible for more than 125,000 hospitalizations and up to 500 infant deaths each year.
  • • RSV occurs in epidemics each fall through spring. The CDC has defined “RSV season” as beginning in November and lasting through March for most parts of North America.
  • • Certain regions have longer RSV seasons than others, with the season beginning as early as July (e.g., Florida) or ending in April.
  • • Despite its prevalence, one-third of mothers have never heard of RSV.

rsv

You’ve come a long way baby…

© Keri Meyers Photography – Click on the photo of Quincy to see her entire NICU photo shoot.

I wrote this post while participating in a campaign for Mom Central Consulting on behalf of MedImmune and I received a promotional item to thank me for my participation.

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